French Baccalaureate

  • With success rates consistently at 100%, and students passing with honors at an average of 90%, FASNY offers excellent preparation for either the ES (Economics and Social Sciences) or S (Math and Sciences) track of the French Baccalaureate.
  • While the coursework is taught primarily in French, students have the option to concurrently pursue the OIB in English, with English and social studies taught in English by American teachers at a level equivalent to AP or honors.

students in labStudent and Teacher

FASNY Students Choose Between Two Concentrations

  • ES Concentration (Economics, History/Geography, and Philosophy) - these courses are designated as honors classes. In addition, ES students are required to enroll in mathematics*, sciences, English, French (native level), a third language (German or Spanish), and physical education courses. *Also available as an honors class.
  • S Concentration (Advanced Mathematics, Biology and Natural Sciences, Physics, and Chemistry) - these courses are designated as honors classes. In addition, S students are required to enroll in philosophy, history/geography, English, French (native level), a third language (German or Spanish), and physical education courses.

With or Without the OIB Honors Option

At FASNY, students who are proficient in English may elect the American Option of the OIB (Option Internationale du Baccalauréat). This program provides a rigorous curriculum in English literature and an integrated history/geography course of study taught by American faculty. These courses are taught at the honors level. OIB is not a separate diploma, but rather a specialization within the framework of the French Baccalaureate. Students prepare for the OIB during 11th and 12th grades. At the end of 12th grade, students take the Baccalaureate exam in their chosen concentration, as well as rigorous exams (written and oral) in both English literature and history/geography. The examiners for the OIB are approved by the College Board.

Please note: The OIB is part of the French Baccalaureate and should not be confused with the International Baccalaureate (IB).

More About the OIB


OIB brochureAEFE Brochure
College Board brochure AEFE brochure on the OIB
(the second part is in English)

FASNY follows the academic curriculum established by the French Ministry of National Education, which develops the examinations for each subject and also appoints the examiners. Each examination consists of a series of essays requiring significant in-depth analysis. Students are also required to sit for two to four oral examinations. The Bac is given over a two-week period in early June.

Curriculum

Grades 11 and 12 ES Track

Eleventh-Grade ES TRACK

English 11 Honors OIB

This advanced, college-level reading and writing course is the first year of the two-year English OIB program. This course devotes a significant portion of study to an in-depth analysis of the various literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction—as recommended by the International Option of the French Baccalaureate. In addition to studying a wide range of genres, students in the course will also work on developing their writing skills through a variety of writing activities, which include formal analytical essays, creative-writing pieces, and short responses.

Course texts include works from the 19th to the 21st centuries by authors from around the globe, and may include such works as Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams, The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri, A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf, Stranger in the Village by James Baldwin, and a selection of poems by Rita Dove. This course is taught at a native level.

English 11

The non-OIB English course, in addition to beginning the preparation for the English LV1 Baccalaureate exam, is a college-preparatory class for near-native English-speaking students who are interested in attending American or Canadian universities. It involves intensive work in improving aural/oral skills as well as reading and writing skills. Students strengthen these skills through the close reading and literary study of selected British and American literature, including novels, plays, short stories, and poetry. In addition to literary study, students practice their grammar and build their vocabulary through readings from contemporary media, traditional exercises, and an ACT preparation text. The literary texts and authors covered include Fences by August Wilson, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, the poetry of T.S. Eliot, and the short stories of Hemingway, Lovecraft, and Le Guin. This course is taught at a native level.

English 11 LV1 for Non-Native Speakers

This course involves intensive work on improving aural/oral skills as well as reading and writing skills, as students begin preparation for the English LV1 Baccalaureate examination. Students review English grammar combined with the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), work on vocabulary development, and read a selection of British and American novels, plays, poetry, and nonfiction (essays, journalistic works, etc.). Texts and authors may include, but are not limited to, Elements of Writing, Wordly Wise, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, Anthem by Ayn Rand, Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett. This course is taught in English.

Economics and Sociology 11 Honors

This course focuses on three central themes that connect all societies. Commercialism is examined from various perspectives, such as that of the household or business, and also through diverse economic activities such as production, consummation, financing, and the management roles played by both markets and governments. Students also study today’s society from a social perspective by analyzing cultural phenomena, socialization, and the nature and scope of different social groups. The political theme focuses on the distinctions among the national state, the federal state, and government systems. This course is taught in French.

European History and World Geography III Honors

The history portion of the course begins with a study of economic growth, globalization, and social changes since the mid-19th century. Students then tackle the 20th century’s main conflicts (the two World Wars and the Cold War) by positioning them in their respective conflicts, then study colonization and decolonization, and, finally, examine the relationship of the French people with the concept of Republic (from the Third Republic to the Fifth Republic). In the geography portion of the course, the year begins with a study of local territories. Students then gain an in-depth knowledge of the French and European territories within the context of globalization. They also work on questions related to sustainable development. In both history and geography, students learn to analyze and interpret documents—such as press articles, cartoons, photography, maps, graphs, etc.—and to draft well-structured, well-written essays. This course is taught in French.

Modern World History and Geography I Honors OIB

This is the first course in a demanding two-year history/geography program that covers the global events and themes that have shaped the modern world.

In the history portion of this course, the topics covered include an introduction to economic and political theory, industrialization and the Dual Revolution, totalitarianism, war in the 20th century (including World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and post-Cold War conflicts), the independence struggles and subsequent challenges facing new states in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, and the New World Order.

In geography, students are introduced to the concepts of globalization, the European Union and its role in a globalized world, the rise of global cities, and the phenomena of urbanization and immigration and the challenges that they pose.

In both history and geography, students develop their ability to analyze and interpret documents (press articles, cartoons, photographs, memoirs, maps, charts, etc.) and to write college-level essays. Students also hone their research and writing skills through a research paper.

French 11 Literature and Composition Honors

This is the final French studies course for Secondary School students and culminates with students taking the Baccalaureate exam. The curriculum builds on themes first presented in the 10th grade, including essay writing, creative writing, and literary commentaries, and is based around the following topics: theater, poetry, applying the art of rhetoric to an investigation of human nature, and the novel. This course is taught in French at a native level.

Interdisciplinary Research Project

Students form research groups and collectively choose a subject to study from a list of official themes (issues of the environment, etc.). Subjects must stem from two main courses of the curriculum (economics and mathematics), and students are evaluated based on their group work. They are allowed a semester to conduct their research and present their work (written essay, video, website, etc.). Students then defend their work in front of a panel. This oral exam is part of the Baccalaureate. This course is taught in French.

Math: Calculus, Statistics, and Probability I

The areas of study covered in this course are:

  • Algebra and Analysis: polynomials, quadratic equations and inequalities, quadratic function, parabola. Square root and cube functions: direction of variations and graph.
  • Calculus: local and global study of functions, limit, derivative, direction of variations, extrema, tangent to the curve, derivative function, derivative of functions, derivative of sum, product, quotient of functions.
  • Percentage and Evolution: successive changes, reciprocal evolution.
  • Sequences: sequences defined by an explicit formula, by a recursive formula, direction of variations, arithmetic and geometric sequences. Applications in finance: simple interest, compound interest.
  • Statistics and Probability: quartiles, deciles, box plot, variance and standard deviation of a statistical series. Random variable: probability distribution, expectation, variance, standard deviation, independent experiments, experiment of Bernoulli, binomial coefficients, binomial distribution, expectation of a binomial distribution, sampling, range of fluctuation.
  • Algorithms: basic (variables, input, output, expressions, functions), conditional statements, iterative loops, pseudo-code. Application: programming with the TI 84 or using a language like Python or Scilab. Set-mathematical notation, logical reasoning (connectors, negation, truth tables, propositions, logical implication), graphing calculator. This course is taught in French.

Math: Calculus, Statistics, Probability, and Finite Math I Honors

The topics covered in this mandatory program are:

  • Algebra and Analysis: polynomials, quadratic equations and inequalities, quadratic function, parabola. Square root and cube functions: direction of variations and graph.
  • Calculus: local and global study of functions, limit, derivative, direction of variations, extrema, tangent to the curve, derivative function, derivative of functions, derivative of sum, product, quotient of functions.
  • Percentage and Evolution: successive changes, reciprocal evolution. Sequences: defined by an explicit formula, by a recursive formula, direction of variations, arithmetic and geometric sequences. Applications in finance: simple interest, compound interest.
  • Statistics and Probability: quartiles, deciles, box plot, variance and standard deviation of a statistical series. Random variable: probability distribution, expectation, variance, standard deviation, independent experiments, experiment of Bernoulli, binomial coefficients, binomial distribution, expectation of a binomial distribution, sampling, range of fluctuation.
  • Algorithms: basic (variables, input, output, expressions, functions), conditional statements, iterative loops, pseudo-code. Application: programming with the TI 84 or using a language like Python or Scilab. Set-mathematical notation, logical reasoning (connectors, negation, truth tables, propositions, logical implication), graphing calculator.
  • Students also study: linear equations with two unknowns, graph, scatter plot, linear curve fitting, regression line, applications to business and economics. Systems of p linear equations in n unknowns: solving by elimination, substitution, echelon matrix method. Matrix algebra, applications to business and economics. Linear programming: systems of linear inequalities, geometric approach, Simplex method using the pivot of Gauss, problems of minimization and maximization.
  • Financial Mathematics: rational exponents, logarithms, geometric series, interest investments, annuities, nominal value, amortization, bonds. Combinatorial analysis: sets, counting techniques, permutations, arrangements, combinations, Pascal’s triangle, binomial theorem, applications, introduction to the Theory of Games. This course is taught in French.

American Math 11 (Elective)

This course is offered to 11th-grade students who are not familiar with American mathematics to help them understand specific American terminology and approaches. Although this course does not directly prepare students for the SAT subject test in mathematics, it serves as a supplement for students’ mathematical knowledge. Topics covered include functions and graphs, polynomials, inequalities and graphs, rational expressions, radicals, analytic geometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, sequences and series, logic, probability and statistics, lines and angles, polygons, circles, and solid geometry. This course is taught in English.

Physics, Chemistry, and Biology 11

The course’s objective is to teach students to think critically of ways in which science and technological innovation implicate society and daily life. In order to instill in students a holistic approach to science, the program comprises a multi-disciplinary study of themes in chemistry, physics, and biology. It is organized in three parts: two themes encompassing all three disciplines (Visual Representation and Solving World Hunger), as well as one theme tied to biology (Feminine/Masculine) and one theme tied to chemistry and physics (The Challenge of Energy). This course is taught in French.

Advanced American Chemistry 11 (Elective)

First semester only. The goal of the course is to expose FASNY students to a typical American high school chemistry curriculum. In addition, the course will help students prepare for the SAT chemistry subject test. However, students who follow the course and want to take the SAT chemistry exam will also need to study on their own to complement this preparation. Prerequisites: The course is geared towards students interested in the sciences, more specifically, chemistry. As the pace of the course will be fast, students who register should have demonstrated strong abilities for the sciences and maintained a good average in physics/ chemistry in grade 10. Topics of the course include structure of matter, states of matter, reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium and reaction rates, thermochemistry, descriptive chemistry, and laboratory schedule. The course is taught in English.

Spanish II (Elective)

Students in grade 11 who started Spanish as a third language (LV3) in grade 10 continue down this path, in accordance with the French program. They explore the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries through a variety of authentic documents. In order to continue to master the language, they review the different grammar structures and enrich their vocabulary banks so as to adequately describe their plans in the past, present, and future, give commands, express an obligation, a possibility, or a doubt, and formulate a hypothesis. Students are asked to actively engage in frequent oral exercises (dialogues, role-play, presentations) on topics ranging from their lives and families to their tastes and habits.

Spanish V

In grade 11, students meet two hours a week. Students practice the different language skills (oral and written expression and comprehension) in order to continue down the path of linguistic autonomy. Cultural topics are centered on the following four themes: heroes and myths, spaces and exchanges, places and forms of power, and the idea of progress. This is an explicit shift toward preparing for the Baccalaureate exam, taken at the end of grade 12.

Spanish 11 for Native Speakers - Spanish AP Literature I

This course is intended for native and near-native speakers of Spanish and taught only in Spanish. Students review Spanish literature through a selection of readings, which includes classical poetry, narrative works, and theater extracts by writers such as Horacio Quiroga, Sabine R. Ulibarrí, Juan Rulfo, Gabriel García Márquez, Leopoldo Alas (“Clarín”), Emilia Pardo Bazán, Carmen Martín Gaite, Ricardo Palma, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Isabel Allende, Federico García Lorca, Antonio Machado, Pablo Neruda, and Nicolás Guillén. They also watch and analyze movies relating to the literature, culture, politics, and history of Spanish-speaking countries. All students begin to prepare themselves for the Baccalaureate exam, taken at the end of grade 12. Some students may choose to take the necessary steps to prepare themselves for the Spanish Literature AP (Advanced Placement) exam. This course meets twice a week.

Spanish SAT II Preparation (Optional)

Students in grade 11 have the option of taking a course to prepare for the Spanish SAT II. The course meets once a week in the second and third trimesters. Students familiarize themselves with the format of the standardized exam (with and without the oral comprehension) using practice tests. In the process of preparing for the Spanish SAT II, students review, consolidate, and deepen their mastery of the Spanish language, notably in their writing.

German V

Analysis and discussions in this course are based on literary texts and original documents. Students in this course also study German poetry across the centuries. This course is taught in German.

Physical Education

In order to optimize Baccalaureate results, students practice, over the course of two years, four sports chosen among those already learned in 10th grade or earlier. These include, but are not limited to, lifeguarding, running (3 x 500 meters), basketball, soccer, fitness, running relay, rock-climbing, volleyball, and badminton. This course is taught in French and English.

Art II (Elective)

Students in this class will complete a variety of assignments that require them to think more creatively and work more independently. In the process, they will begin to develop their own visual voices. Students will take part in group critiques of their work, participate in art history discussions, and enjoy other experiences that will help them develop an awareness of their own artistic sensibilities and concerns. The ultimate goal of this course is to prepare students technically and conceptually for further study of art at FASNY and in college. Students will focus on improving their ability to render complex natural forms from direct observation. In particular, they will explore the beauty of human form through lessons on proportion, shading, gesture, the skeletal system, and capturing the expressive qualities of the model. Students will continue the development of a portfolio of original artwork that can be used for further study in art, as preparation for the Baccalaureate exam, and as a supplement to their college applications. This course is taught in English.

Current Events (Elective)

Students explore, research, discuss, and make both individual and group presentations with respect to salient current-events themes. Newspaper, radio, online media, and other Internet resources are used.

Latin IV (Elective)

Students read original texts with four themes:

  • Narratives and Testimonies
  • Rhetoric: The speaker and the power of speech
  • Theater: Text and performance
  • Poetry: Love and flames

Studies focus on Latin grammar, stylistics, vocabulary, etymology, literature, and civilization. Connections with other texts from the French and English curricula are made as often as possible. This course also includes notions of ancient Greek culture and language. This elective course is taught in French.

Music (Elective)

This course focuses on musical practices. Group listening is emphasized, which allows students to deepen their understanding of music through a study of space, time, color, and form. Students are exposed to a variety of musical works from different eras, genres, and styles. Classroom teaching is enriched by music practices (both vocal and instrumental). This course is taught in French.

Twelfth-Grade ES TRACK

Economics and Sociology 12 Honors

Economics 12 Honors is a continuum of the course taught in 11th-grade ES. It is meant to enable students to progressively integrate the concepts, methods, and key questions of three fields of social science: economics, sociology, and political science. The economics unit is organized around three themes: growth, fluctuations, and crises; globalization, international finance, and European integration; and economics of sustainable development. The sociology unit focuses on class, structure, social mobility and integration, conflict, and social change. The political science unit deals with social justice and inequalities and work, employment, and unemployment.

Advance Topics Economics and Sociology 12 Honors

The program is built around three main themes:

  • Economy and demography: How demographic dynamics affect economic growth and the impact of economic and demographic variables on the financing of social protection.
  • Business strategies and competition policy in a globalized economy: Under which circumstances can firms exercise market power and the role of competition policy.
  • Financial instability and regulation: How financial globalization works, the mechanisms that lead to financial crises, and the regulation of the financial system.

English 12 Honors OIB

This advanced, college-level reading and writing course is the second year of the two-year English OIB program. Building on the work done by students in the 11th grade, this course not only devotes a significant portion of study to an in-depth analysis of the various literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction—but also prepares students for the Baccalaureate exam through periodic mock written and oral exams taken in exam conditions. In addition to essays written in exam conditions, students develop their writing skills through a variety of writing activities, including journals, short responses, and creative-writing pieces. A significant portion of the year is dedicated to extensive study of the works in-depth—those texts that will be the focus of the Baccalaureate oral exam—with particular focus on students developing strategies and techniques for effectively close-reading the language, literary features, and meaning of significant passages from those works.

Texts and authors include, but are not limited to, Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Tempest by William Shakespeare, Beloved by Toni Morrison, Intimate Apparel by Lynn Nottage, and a selection of poems by Robert Frost. This course is taught at a native level.

English 12

The non-OIB English course, in addition to preparing students for the English LV1 Baccalaureate exam, is a college-preparatory class for near-native or native English-speaking students who are interested in attending American or Canadian universities. Students work on developing their writing skills, as well as their reading and aural/oral skills, through a variety of activities, both written and oral, as they engage in the close reading and analysis of literary works, including novels, plays, short stories, and poetry. In addition to literary study, students practice their grammar and build their vocabulary through readings from contemporary media, traditional exercises, as well as the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS), and SAT preparation. Texts and authors may include, but are not limited to, Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler, The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead, The Road by Cormac McCarthy, Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw, as well as contemporary essays. This course is taught at a native level.

English 12 LV1 for Non-Native Speakers

This course involves intensive work on improving aural/oral skills as well as reading and writing skills in preparation for the English LV1 Baccalaureate examination, International English Language Testing System (IELTS), and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Students review English grammar, work on vocabulary development, practice TOEFL and IELTS exercises, and read a selection of British and American novels, plays, and poetry. A variety of literary genres, including fiction (long, short, drama, poetry) and nonfiction (essays, journalistic works), is included. Texts and authors include Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler, Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw, V for Vendetta by Lloyd and Moore, Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Pattillo Beals, contemporary essays, and poetry. This course is taught in English.

Philosophy Honors

Students are invited to think critically and analytically about academic subject matters, including history, literature, art, mathematics, the sciences, etc. They develop the ability to critique, reflect in a highly logical and thorough manner, and take an inquiry stance with respect to major themes that have interested society throughout history: law and justice, power, religion, work, the nature of human logic, the nature of knowledge, etc. In order for students to form their own well-founded opinions, they are asked to draw from the works of great Western philosophers and schools of thought developed from Greco-Roman antiquity through the modern era. Students are trained to write commentaries and dissertations in preparation for the Baccalaureate exam. Specifically, students learn to discern the essential issues contained within a philosophical question, clearly explore different points of view, extend beyond facts to the conceptualization of abstract ideas, and logically organize a personal reflection from introduction to conclusion. The course is taught via lectures, presentations, discussion, and analysis of texts from the great philosophical works and the reading of important authors recommended by the French Ministry of National Education. The philosophical themes covered in the course include:

  • human nature: conscience, unconscious, otherness, and desire
  • culture: language, art, work, religion, and history
  • reason and reality: demonstrations, interpretations, matter and spirit, and truth
  • politics: nature of society, justice and law, and the State
  • ethics: freedom, morals, and happiness

This course is taught in French and designated as an Honors course because more curricular hours are designated and, as a result, the course goes into further breadth and depth than the course titled Philosophy S Curriculum. Furthermore, the course builds from the introductory philosophy course that is a prerequisite for all ES Curriculum students in the 11th-grade year.

European History and World Geography IV Honors

The history portion of this course allows students to focus on understanding the 20th century. They study the relationship between societies and their past, ideologies, and opinions and beliefs of the last century, as well as the birth of two great powers (United States and China). They also study the different levels of government in the world since 1945, examining France as a nation-state, European unity since the 1948 Hague Conference, as well as the world economic governance since Bretton Woods.

The geography portion of the course focuses on the world, globalization, and the main continents (the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa) and their dynamics. This course is taught in French.

Modern World History and Geography II Honors OIB

This is the second course in a demanding two-year history/geography program that covers the global events and themes that have shaped the modern world. The culminating examination is the History/Geography portion of the OIB (International Option) of the French Baccalaureate exam.

The history portion of this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the modern world. Students study the rise to power of the U.S. and China in the 20th century, conflict in the Middle East, as well as the relationship between societies and their past and ideologies, opinions, and beliefs from the end of the 19th century to today. They also study three scales of governance since 1945, examining France as a nation- state, European unity since the 1948 Hague Conference, and world economic and political governance since the Bretton Woods conference. In addition, students will review the social and political history of the U.S. since 1945.

In geography, students study globalization, its actors and the flows that they generate, and the corresponding shifts in economic power. The curriculum includes in-depth studies of several regions, including the Americas (e.g., regional cooperation and tensions, the rise of Brazil), Africa, and South and East Asia. Students develop expertise in the analysis of geo-political, geo-economic, geo-cultural, and geo-environmental maps.

Math: Calculus, Statistics, and Probability II

The topics covered in this curriculum are:

  • Calculus: Exponential, logarithmic functions. Continuity, Intermediate Value Theorem, differentiation, convexity, inflexion point, Riemann integral, areas calculation.
  • Sequences: Geometric sequences and series, arithmetic-geometric sequences, limits.
  • Probability and Statistics: Conditional probability, Law of Total Probability (Bayes’ formula), independent events, density function of a continuous random variable, uniform distribution, standard normal distribution, Moivre-Laplace Theorem, normal distribution N, estimation theory (prediction interval, confidence interval).
  • Algorithms: Basics (variables, input, output, expressions, functions), conditional statements, iterative loops, recursivity.
  • Application: Programming with the TI 84 or using a language like Python or Matlab. Set-mathematical notation, logical reasoning (connectors, negation, truth tables, propositions, logical implication). Graphing calculator. This course is taught in French.

Math: Calculus, Statistics and Probability, and Finite Math II (Honors)

The topics covered in this curriculum are:

  • Calculus: Exponential, logarithmic functions. Continuity, Intermediate Value Theorem, differentiation, convexity, inflexion point, Riemann integral, areas calculation.
  • Sequences: Geometric sequences and series, arithmetic-geometric sequences, limits.
  • Probability and Statistics: Conditional probability, Law of Total Probability (Bayes’ formula), independent events, density function of a continuous random variable, uniform distribution, standard normal distribution, Moivre-Laplace Theorem, normal distribution N, estimation theory (prediction interval, confidence interval).
  • Algorithms: Basics (variables, input, output, expressions, functions), conditional statements, iterative loops, recursivity.
  • Application: Programming with the TI 84 or using a language like Python or Matlab. Set-mathematical notation, logical reasoning (connectors, negation, truth tables, propositions, logical implication). Graphing calculator. This course is taught in French.

German VI

Analysis and discussions in this course are based on literary texts and original documents. Students are expected to present written and oral work relating to such texts. This course is taught in German.

Spanish III (Elective)

Students in grade 12 who started Spanish as a third language (LV3) in grade 10 continue down this path in accordance with the French program. Students are given ample opportunities to review and solidify grammar and vocabulary basics. They are also asked to deepen their mastery of the language through the study of various authentic documents: visual texts (literature, cartoons, advertisements) as well as audio-visual materials that expose the students to the different accents of the Spanish-speaking world and the diverse cultures within it. Students are challenged to enrich their expression as they continue to communicate through comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing when grappling with more mature, complex world topics. The course material falls under the four major themes of the Baccalaureate exam: heroes and myths, spaces and exchanges, places and forms of power, and the idea of progress. Students of LV3 may choose to prepare for the oral component of the Baccalaureate exam, although this is optional.

Spanish VI

In grade 12, students are fully engaged in preparing for the Baccalaureate exam. This cumulative exam covers four broad themes: heroes and myths, spaces and exchanges, places and forms of power, and the idea of progress. Students tackle these multi-faceted topics through a variety of assessments that solicit their ability to listen, understand, speak, read, and write. ES and S series take the same Baccalaureate exam in Spanish.

Spanish 12 for Native Speakers - AP Literature II

This course is intended for native and near-native speakers of Spanish and taught only in Spanish. Students review Spanish literature through a selection of Spanish and Latin American readings by writers such as Santiago Roncagliolo or Dulce Chacón. The students also watch films relating to the literature, culture, politics, and history of Spanish-speaking countries. They also continue to prepare themselves for the Baccalaureate exam by exploring themes and documents that fall under four major categories: heroes and myths, spaces and exchanges, places and forms of power, and the idea of progress. The course meets twice a week.

Spanish SAT II Preparation (Optional)

Students in grade 12 have the option to continue the prep course for the Spanish SAT II. The course meets once a week in the first trimester only. Students continue to familiarize themselves with the format of the standardized exam (with the oral comprehension) using practice tests.

Physical Education

In accordance with the physical education curriculum of the Baccalaureate, students are graded in three sports within different athletic domains. These include, but are not limited to, lifeguarding, running (3 x 500 meters), basketball, soccer, fitness, dance, running relay, rock-climbing, volleyball, and badminton. This course is taught in French and English.

Art III (Elective)

This course prepares students for the Baccalaureate exam in visual art. Three specific works of art are studied in depth, and students are encouraged to forge connections among these three works and their own creative explorations. Students construct a portfolio of works throughout the year, including sketches, drawings, photographs, and finished projects in a variety of media. The resulting portfolio documents the student’s personal artistic process, growth, and understanding in the broader context of art history and culture. This course is taught in English. The oral exam is conducted in French.

Latin V (Elective)

This course is the final one in the sequence of the Latin curriculum in the Secondary School and culminates in an oral exam of the French Baccalaureate. Students engage in oral and written activities based on themes such as philosophical thinking, scientific reasoning, and political thought and the reading of the program-mandated text (the text is changed every two years). Connections with other texts from the French and English curricula are made as often as possible. This course also includes notions of ancient Greek culture and language. The Latin section of the French Baccalaureate has a coefficient 3. This elective course is taught in French.

Music (Elective)

This course focuses on musical practices. Group listening is emphasized, which allows students to deepen their understanding of music through a study of space, time, color, and form. Students are exposed to a variety of musical works from different eras, genres, and styles. Classroom teaching is enriched by music practices (both vocal and instrumental). This course is taught in French.


Grades 11 and 12 S Track

Eleventh-Grade S TRACK

English 11 Honors OIB

This advanced, college-level reading and writing course is the first year of the two-year English OIB program. This course devotes a significant portion of study to an in-depth analysis of the various literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction—as recommended by the International Option of the French Baccalaureate. In addition to studying a wide range of genres, students in the course will also work on developing their writing skills through a variety of writing activities that include formal analytical essays, creative-writing pieces, and short responses.

Course texts include works from the 19th to the 21st centuries by authors from around the globe, and may include such works as Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams, The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri, A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf, Stranger in the Village by James Baldwin, and a selection of poems by Rita Dove. This course is taught at a native level.

English 11

The non-OIB English course, in addition to beginning the preparation for the English LV1 Baccalaureate exam, is a college-preparatory class for near-native English- speaking students who are interested in attending American or Canadian universities. It involves intensive work on improving aural/oral skills as well as reading and writing skills. Students strengthen these skills through the close reading and literary study of selected British and American literature, including novels, plays, short stories, and poetry. In addition to literary study, students practice their grammar and build their vocabulary through readings from contemporary media, traditional exercises, and an ACT preparation text. The literary texts and authors covered include Fences by August Wilson, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, the poetry of T.S. Eliot, and the short stories of Hemingway, Lovecraft, and Le Guin. This course is taught at a native level.

English 11 LV1 for Non-Native Speakers

This course involves intensive work on improving aural/oral skills, as well as reading and writing skills, as students begin preparation for the English LV1 Baccalaureate examination. Students review English grammar combined with the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), work on vocabulary development, and read a selection of British and American novels, plays, poetry, and nonfiction (essays, journalistic works). Texts and authors may include, but are not limited to, Elements of Writing, Wordly Wise, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, Anthem by Ayn Rand, Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett. This course is taught in English.

French 11 Literature and Composition Honors

This is the final French studies course for Secondary School students and culminates with students taking the Baccalaureate exam. The curriculum builds on themes first presented in the 10th grade, including essay writing, creative writing, and literary commentaries, and is based around the following topics: theater, poetry, applying the art of rhetoric to an investigation of human nature, and the novel. This course is taught in French at a native level.

European History and World Geography III Honors

This course, titled Questions to Understand the 21st Century, opens with a study of economic growth, globalization, and social change since the mid-19th century. It continues with a study of the major conflicts of the 20th century and of the totalitarianisms in Europe (Soviet, Fascist, and Nazi). The course ends with a study of the Republic faced with the major challenges of the 20th century.

In geography, the course opens with a study of local territories, then examines the development of the French territory, before ending with the European Union and its place in the world. In both history and geography, students learn to analyze and interpret documents—such as press articles, cartoons, photography, maps, graphs, etc.—and to draft well-structured, well-written essays. This course is taught in French.

Modern World History and Geography I Honors OIB

This is the first course in a demanding two-year history/geography program that covers the global events and themes that have shaped the modern world. In the history portion of this course, the topics covered include an introduction to economic and political theory, industrialization and the Dual Revolution, totalitarianism, war in the 20th century (including World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and post-Cold War conflicts), the independence struggles and subsequent challenges facing new states in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, and the New World Order.

In geography, students are introduced to the concepts of globalization, the European Union and its role in a globalized world, the rise of global cities, and the phenomena of urbanization and immigration and the challenges that they pose.

In both history and geography, students develop their ability to analyze and interpret documents (press articles, cartoons, photographs, memoirs, maps, charts, etc.) and to write college-level essays.

Interdisciplinary Research Project

Students form research groups and collectively choose a subject to study from a list of official themes (issues of the environment, etc.). Subjects must stem from two main courses of the curriculum (economics and mathematics), and students are evaluated based on their group work. They are allowed a semester to conduct their research and present their work (written essay, video, website, etc.). Students then defend their work in front of a panel. This oral exam is part of the Baccalaureate. This course is taught in French.

Math: Advanced Calculus, Vector Geometry, and Probability I Honors

Algebra and Trigonometry: polynomials, quadratic equations and inequalities, unit circle, radian, trigonometric equations and formulas, law of sines, law of cosines.

Calculus and Analysis: square-root function, absolute value function; global and local study of numerical functions: limit, derivative, graph, tangent to the curve, direction of variation, extrema; derivative function, derivative of sum, product and quotient of functions.

Sequences: explicit formula, recursive formula, direction of variation, limit at infinity; arithmetic, geometric sequences and series, limit at infinity.

Vector Geometry: condition of collinearity of two vectors, expression of a vector in terms of two noncollinear vectors, direction vector of a line, Cartesian equation of a line, oriented angle of two vectors, scalar product of two vectors, calculations of lengths and angles, the median theorem, orthogonality of two vectors, vector normal to a line, equations of a circle.

Statistics and Probability: quartiles, deciles, box plot, variance and standard deviation of statistical series random variable: probability distribution, expectation, variance, standard deviation, independent experiments, Bernoulli experiment, binomial coefficients, Pascal’s triangle; binomial distribution: expectation, variance, standard deviation; sampling, range of fluctuation.

Algorithms: Basic (variables, input, output, expressions, functions), conditional statements, iterative loops, pseudo-code. Application: programming with the TI 84 or using a language like Python or Scilab. Set-mathematical notation, logical reasoning (connectors, negation, truth tables, propositions, logical implication). Graphing calculator, geometry software. This course is taught in French.

American Math 11 (Elective)

This course is offered to 11th-grade students who are not familiar with American mathematics to help them understand specific American terminology and approaches. Although this course does not directly prepare students for the SAT subject test in mathematics, it serves as a supplement to students’ mathematical knowledge. Topics covered include functions and graphs, polynomials, inequalities and graphs, rational expressions, radicals, analytic geometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, sequences and series, logic, probability and statistics, lines and angles, polygons, circles, and solid geometry. This course is taught in English.

Biology and Natural Sciences 11 Honors

This course is divided into three themes. The first theme, The Earth in the Universe, Life, and the Evolution of the Living, presents the expression, stability, and variations in genetic heritage, as well as the study of tectonic plates (history of a model). When studying the second theme, Contemporary Challenges to the Planet, students focus on applied geology and the question of solving world hunger. Finally, when approaching Human Body and Health, students will focus on feminine and masculine, genetic variations and health, and “from the eye to the brain.” The discipline has three main objectives: building general background knowledge of scientific issues, contributing to forming critical thinking and civic education, and preparing for future studies by developing methodological and technical aptitudes. This course is taught in French.

Physics and Chemistry 11 Honors

The honors Physics and Chemistry course in 11th grade uses a thematic approach. The three thematic units are: Observation (colors and images; How does the eye operate? Where does colored light come from? How is color created?); Understanding (laws and templates; What are the physical forces in the universe? What interactions explain both stabilities and the physical and chemical evolution of matter? What models are used to describe these processes? With what types of energy are they associated?); and Moving to Action (21st-century challenges; How can science tackle the challenge of human development in a way that is respectful of the planet?). This course is taught in French.

Advanced American Chemistry 11 (Elective)

First semester only. The goal of the course is to expose FASNY students to a typical American high-school chemistry curriculum. In addition, the course will help students prepare for the SAT chemistry subject test. However, students who follow the course and want to take the SAT chemistry exam will also need to study on their own to complement this preparation.

Prerequisites: The course is geared towards students interested in the sciences, more specifically, chemistry. As the pace of the course will be fast, students who register should have demonstrated strong abilities in the sciences and should have maintained a good average in Physics/Chemistry in grade 10. Topics of the course include structure of matter, states of matter, reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium and reaction rates, thermochemistry, descriptive chemistry, laboratory schedule. The course is taught in English.

Advanced American Physics 11 (Elective)

Second semester only. The goal of the course is to complement the physics part of the Ministry of French National Education’s Physique-Chimie course that students in 1ère S and Terminale S take at FASNY with topics studied in a typical American high-school physics course.

Topics include Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics and thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, atomic and nuclear physics, laboratory. This course is taught in English.

German V

Analysis and discussions in this course are based on literary texts and original documents. Students in this course also study German poetry across the centuries. This course is taught in German.

Spanish II (Elective)

Students in grade 11 who started Spanish as a third language (LV3) in grade 10 continue down this path in accordance with the French program. They explore the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries through a variety of authentic documents. In order to continue to master the language, they review the different grammar structures and enrich their vocabulary banks so as to adequately describe their plans in the past, present, and future; give commands; express an obligation, a possibility, or a doubt; and formulate a hypothesis. Students are asked to actively engage in frequent oral exercises (dialogues, role-play, oral presentations) on topics ranging from their lives and families to their tastes and habits. This prepares them for the oral component of the Baccalaureate exam, taken the following year.

Spanish V

In grade 11, students meet two hours a week. Students practice the different language skills (oral and written expression and comprehension) in order to continue down the path of linguistic autonomy. Cultural topics are centered on the following four themes: heroes and myths, spaces and exchanges, places and forms of power, and the idea of progress. This is an explicit shift toward preparing for the Baccalaureate exam, taken at the end of grade 12.

Spanish 11 for Native Speakers - Spanish AP Literature I

This course is intended for native and near-native speakers of Spanish and taught only in Spanish. Students review Spanish literature through a selection of readings that includes classical poetry, narrative works, and theater extracts by writers such as Horacio Quiroga, Sabine R. Ulibarrí, Juan Rulfo, Gabriel García Márquez, Leopoldo Alas (“Clarín”), Emilia Pardo Bazán, Carmen Martín Gaite, Ricardo Palma, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Isabel Allende, Federico García Lorca, Antonio Machado, Pablo Neruda, and Nicolás Guillén. They also watch and analyze movies relating to the literature, culture, politics, and history of Spanish-speaking countries. All students begin to prepare themselves for the Baccalaureate exam, taken at the end of grade 12. Some students may choose to take the necessary steps to prepare themselves for the Spanish Literature AP (Advanced Placement) exam. This course meets twice a week.

Spanish SAT II Preparation (Optional)

Students in grade 11 have the option of taking a course to prepare for the Spanish SAT II. The course meets once a week in the second and third trimesters. Students familiarize themselves with the format of the standardized exam (with and without the oral comprehension) using practice tests. In the process of preparing for the Spanish SAT II, students review, consolidate, and deepen their mastery of the Spanish language, notably in their writing.

Physical Education

In order to optimize Baccalaureate results, students practice, over the course of two years, four sports chosen from among those already learned in 10th grade or earlier. These include, but are not limited to, lifeguarding, running (3 x 500 meters), basketball, soccer, fitness, running relay, rock-climbing, volleyball, and badminton. This course is taught in French and English.

Art II (Elective)

Students in this class will complete a variety of assignments that require them to think more creatively and work more independently. In the process, they will begin to develop their own visual voices. Students will take part in group critiques of their work, participate in art history discussions, and enjoy other experiences that will help them to develop an awareness of their own artistic sensibilities and concerns. The ultimate goal of this course is to prepare students technically and conceptually for further study of art at FASNY and in college. Students will focus on improving their ability to render complex natural forms from direct observation. In particular, they will explore the beauty of human form through lessons in proportion, shading, gesture, the skeletal system, and capturing the expressive qualities of the model. Students will continue the development of a portfolio of original artwork that can be used for further study in art, as preparation for the Baccalaureate exam, and as a supplement to their college applications. This course is taught in English.

Current Events (Elective)

Students explore, research, discuss, and make both individual and group presentations with respect to salient current-events themes. Newspaper, radio, online media, and other Internet resources are used.

Latin IV (Elective)

Students read original texts with four themes:

  • Narratives and Testimonies
  • Rhetoric: The speaker and the power of speech
  • Theater: Text and performance
  • Poetry: Love and flames

Studies focus on Latin grammar, stylistics, vocabulary, etymology, literature, and civilization. Connections with other texts from the French and English curricula are made as often as possible. This course also includes notions of ancient Greek culture and language. This elective course is taught in French.

Music (Elective)

This course focuses on musical practices. Group listening is emphasized, which allows students to deepen their understanding of music through a study of space, time, color, and form. Students are exposed to a variety of musical works from different eras, genres, and styles. Classroom teaching is enriched by music practices (both vocal and instrumental). This course is taught in French.

Twelfth-Grade S TRACK

English 12 Honors OIB

This advanced, college-level reading and writing course is the second year of the two-year English OIB program. Building on the work done by students in the 11th grade, this course not only devotes a significant portion of study to an in-depth analysis of the various literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction—it also prepares students for the Baccalaureate exam through periodic mock written and oral exams taken in exam conditions. In addition to essays written in exam conditions, students develop their writing skills through a variety of writing activities, including journals, short responses, and creative-writing pieces. A significant portion of the year is dedicated to extensive study of the works in-depth—those texts that will be the focus of the Baccalaureate oral exam—with particular focus on students developing strategies and techniques for effectively close-reading the language, literary features, and meaning of significant passages from those works.

Texts and authors include, but are not limited to, Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Tempest by William Shakespeare, Beloved by Toni Morrison, Intimate Apparel by Lynn Nottage, and a selection of poems by Robert Frost. This course is taught at a native level.

English 12

The non-OIB English course, in addition to preparing students for the English LV1 Baccalaureate exam, is a college-preparatory class for near-native or native English-speaking students who are interested in attending American or Canadian universities. Students work on developing their writing skills as well as their reading and aural/oral skills through a variety of activities, both written and oral, as they engage in the close reading and analysis of literary works, including novels, plays, short stories, and poetry. In addition to literary study, students practice their grammar and build their vocabulary through readings from contemporary media, traditional exercises, as well as the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS), and SAT preparation. Texts and authors may include, but are not limited to, Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler, The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead, The Road by Cormac McCarthy, Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw, and contemporary essays. This course is taught at a native level.

English 12 LV1 for Non-Native Speakers

This course involves intensive work on improving aural/oral skills, as well as reading and writing skills, in preparation for the English LV1 Baccalaureate examination, International English Language Testing System (IELTS), and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Students review English grammar, work on vocabulary development, practice TOEFL and IELTS exercises, and read a selection of British and American novels, plays, and poetry. A variety of literary genres, including fiction (long, short, drama, poetry) and nonfiction (essays, journalistic works), is included. Texts and authors include Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler, Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw, V for Vendetta by Lloyd and Moore, Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Pattillo Beals, contemporary essays, and poetry. This course is taught in English.

Philosophy

Students are invited to think critically and analytically about academic subject matter, including history, literature, art, mathematics, the sciences, etc. They develop the ability to critique, reflect in a highly logical and thorough manner, and take an inquiry stance with respect to major themes that have interested society throughout history: law and justice, power, religion, work, the nature of human logic, the nature of knowledge, etc. In order for students to form their own well-founded opinions, they are asked to draw from the works of great Western philosophers and schools of thought developed from Greco-Roman antiquity through the modern era. Students are trained to write commentaries and dissertations in preparation for the Baccalaureate exam. Specifically, students learn to discern the essential issues contained within a philosophical question, clearly explore different points of view, extend beyond facts to the conceptualization of abstract ideas, and logically organize a personal reflection from introduction to conclusion. The course is taught via lectures, presentations, discussion, analysis of texts from the great philosophical works, and the reading of important authors recommended by the French Ministry of National Education. The philosophical themes covered in the course include:

  • human nature: conscience, unconscious, otherness, and desire
  • culture: language, art, work, religion, and history
  • reason and reality: demonstrations, interpretations, matter and spirit, and truth
  • politics: nature of society, justice and law, and the State
  • ethics: freedom, morals, and happiness

This course is taught in French.

European History and World Geography IV

In history, students are invited to deeply reflect upon the challenges facing today’s world. They consider the relationship between societies and their past as well as the concept of memory. They study the super-powers and conflicts throughout the world since 1945. They also study the scale of the government in the world since 1945. In geography, the course opens with a reading grid for a complex world, then tackles the forces at play in globalization, and ends with an analysis of the large, continent-scale geographical dynamics. This course is taught in French.

Modern World History and Geography II Honors OIB

This is the second course in a demanding two-year history/geography program that covers the global events and themes that have shaped the modern world. The culminating examination is the History/Geography portion of the OIB (International Option) of the French Baccalaureate exam.

The history portion of this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the modern world. Students study the rise to power of the U.S. and China in the 20th century, conflict in the Middle East, as well as the relationship between societies and their past and ideologies, opinions, and beliefs from the end of the 19th century to today. They also study three scales of governance since 1945, examining France as a nation- state, European unity since the 1948 Hague Conference, and world economic and political governance since the Bretton Woods conference. In addition, students will review the social and political history of the U.S. since 1945.

In geography, students study globalization, its actors and the flows that they generate, and the corresponding shifts in economic power. The curriculum includes in-depth studies of several regions, including the Americas (e.g., regional cooperation and tensions and the rise of Brazil), Africa, and South and East Asia. Students develop expertise in the analysis of geo-political, geo-economic, geo-cultural, and geo-environmental maps.

Math: Advanced Calculus, Vector Geometry, and Probability II Honors

The topics covered in this curriculum are:

  • Calculus: Exponential, logarithmic, power and trigonometric functions. Limits and continuity, Intermediate Value Theorem, differentiation, Riemann integral, areas calculation. Asymptote of a curve.
  • Sequences: Proof by mathematical induction, limits, bounded above or below sequences.
  • Algebra and Geometry: Complex numbers (equations, geometric representation, trigonometric, exponential form).
  • Spatial Vector Geometry: lines and planes, vectors, Scalar Product.
  • Probability and Statistics: Conditional probability, Law of Total Probability (Bayes’ formula), independent events, density function of a continuous random variable, uniform distribution, exponential distribution, standard normal distribution, Moivre-Laplace Theorem, normal distribution N, Estimation Theory (prediction interval, confidence interval).
  • Algorithms: Basics (variables, input, output, expressions, functions), conditional statements, Iterative loops, recursivity.
  • Application: Programming with the TI 84 or using a language like Python or Matlab. Set-mathematical notation, logical reasoning (connectors, negation, truth tables, propositions, logical implication). Graphing calculator. This course is taught in French.

Math - Advanced Topics in Math 12 Honors: Linear Algebra and Number Theory

  • Number Theory: divisibility, Euclidean division, congruence in Z, prime numbers, relatively prime numbers, Bézout’s identity, Gauss’ theorem, Fermat’s little theorem.
  • Problem-Solving: Coding, cryptography, encryptions.
  • Matrix and Sequences: Operations, inverse, linear systems in more than two variables, sequences of matrix.
  • Problem-Solving: Random walk, Markov chains, Ehrenfest Diffusion Model, Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model.

Biology / Natural Sciences 12 Honors

This course builds on knowledge learned in prior science courses and combines lectures and lab exercises. The content focuses on the following themes:

    • Earth in the Universe, Life, and the Evolution of Living Things: genetic variation related to sexual reproduction and a few aspects of the mechanisms of evolution (study of angiosperm)
    • A few aspects of continental geologic transformations are discussed to introduce the theme of Contemporary Global Issues; two questions are addressed:
        • man’s domestication of the plant
        • the thermal properties of the Earth as possible energy sources and as elements in the understanding of how the Earth operates
    • Human Body and Health is structured around two questions:
        • A few aspects of immune relations allow to stabilize and complete middle school knowledge and to link this theme to an evolving vision.
        • Study of the somatic nervous system in association with the spinal reflex will reinforce the notion of “reflex,” while giving a solid background on neurons and synapses.

Advanced Topics in Biology and Natural Sciences 12 Honors for Students Specializing in Biology:
In this section of biology and geology, three themes are covered:

  • Earth in the Universe, Life, and the Evolution of Life: energy and the living cell (limited to eukaryotic cells), photosynthesis, respiration, fermentation, ATP
  • Contemporary Global Issues: atmosphere, hydrosphere, climates (past to future); understanding the origin of climate; comparison of today’s atmosphere and the initial one are tools for determining ancient paleoclimates; understanding greenhouse effect
  • Human Body and Health: glycemia and diabetes. Glycemia is a parameter of the internal environment; maintaining it within a narrow range is indicative of good health (enzymatic action, regulation of glycemia, origin of diabetes). This course is taught in French.

Physics and Chemistry 12 Honors / Physique-Chimie

In the 12th-grade Physics and Chemistry course, students explore three fields:

1) Waves and Matter. Waves and particles convey information. How are they detected? What are the characteristics and properties of waves? How do we create and use spectra to identify atoms and molecules?

2) Laws and Models. How are periodic phenomena used to measure time? In what way is the concept of time essential to relativity? Which parameters influence chemical evolution? How can the structure of a molecule help in identifying its properties? How do organic reactions and proton exchanges contribute to the transformation of matter? How do energy transfers of different scales occur? How is quantum reality manifested, especially with regard to light?

3) 21st-century challenges. In what ways can science tackle the challenges met by humankind in its endeavor for sustainable development? Saving resources and respecting the environment, synthesizing molecules and manufacturing new materials, transferring and storing information, creating and innovating. The course is taught in French.

Advanced Topics in Physics and Chemistry 12 Honors for S Students Concentrating in Physics/Chemistry:
For students concentrating in physics and chemistry, the course prepares them for college work in this area.

Students will concentrate on three areas essential to any scientist: experimenting, analysis and synthesis of scientific documents, and the resolution of scientific problems. In this perspective, the curriculum uses three study areas:

1) Water: Water and its environment, water and resources (producing drinkable water, mineral and organic resources in the oceans). Water and energy: fuel cells and production of dihydrogen

2) Sound and music: musical instruments, transmitting and receiving sounds, sound and architecture

3) Materials: the cycle of life: development, aging, corrosion, protection, and recycling. Structure and properties: conductors, superconductors, liquid crystals, semi-conductor devices, photovoltaics. New materials: nanotubes, nanoparticles, composite materials. The course is taught in French.

Advanced American Physics 12 (Elective)

The goal of the course is to complement the physics part of the Ministry of French National Education’s course that students in 1ère S and Terminale S take at FASNY with topics studied in a typical American high-school physics course.

Prerequisites: The course is geared towards students in the S section of 11th and 12th grades interested in physics. As the pace of the course will be fast, students must have maintained a good average in Physics/

Chemistry in grade 10 and during the first semester of grade 11. Topics of the course include Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics and thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, atomic and nuclear physics, laboratory. The course is taught in English.

German VI

Analysis and discussions in this course are based on literary texts and original documents. Students are expected to present written and oral work relating to such texts. This course is taught in German.

Spanish III (Elective)

Students in grade 12 who started Spanish as a third language (LV3) in grade 10 continue down this path in accordance with the French program. Students are given ample opportunities to review and solidify grammar and vocabulary basics. They are also asked to deepen their mastery of the language through the study of various authentic documents: visual texts (literature, cartoons, advertisements) as well as audio-visual materials that expose the students to the different accents of the Spanish-speaking world as well as the diverse cultures within it. Students are challenged to enrich their expression as they continue to communicate through comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing when grappling with more mature, complex world topics. The course material falls under the four major themes of the Baccalaureate exam: heroes and myths, spaces and exchanges, places and forms of power, and the idea of progress. Students in LV3 may choose to prepare for the oral component of the Baccalaureate exam, although this is optional.

Spanish VI

In grade 12, students are now fully engaged in preparing for the Baccalaureate exam. This cumulative exam covers four broad themes: heroes and myths, spaces and exchanges, places and forms of power, and the idea of progress. Students tackle these multi-faceted topics through a variety of assessments that solicit their ability to listen, understand, speak, read, and write. ES and S series take the same Baccalaureate exam in Spanish.

Spanish 12 for Native Speakers - Spanish AP Literature II

This course is intended for native and near-native speakers of Spanish and taught only in Spanish. Students review Spanish literature through a selection of Spanish and Latin American readings by writers such as Santiago Roncagliolo or Dulce Chacón. They also watch films relating to the literature, culture, politics, and history of Spanish-speaking countries and continue to prepare themselves for the Baccalaureate exam by exploring themes and documents that fall under four major categories: heroes and myths, spaces and exchanges, places and forms of power, and the idea of progress. The course meets twice a week.

Spanish SAT II Preparation (Optional)

Students in grade 12 have the option to continue the prep course for the Spanish SAT II. The course meets once a week in the first trimester only. Students continue to familiarize themselves with the format of the standardized exam (with oral comprehension) using practice tests.

Physical Education

In accordance with the Physical Education curriculum of the Baccalaureate, students are graded in three sports within different athletic domains. These include, but are not limited to, lifeguarding, running (3 x 500 meters), basketball, soccer, fitness, dance, running relay, rock- climbing, volleyball, and badminton. This course is taught in French and English.

Art III (Elective)

This course prepares students for the Baccalaureate exam in visual art.

Three specific works of art are studied in depth, and students are encouraged to forge connections among these three works and their own creative explorations. Students construct a portfolio of work throughout the year, including sketches, drawings, photographs, and finished projects in a variety of media. The resulting portfolio documents the student’s personal artistic process, growth, and understanding in the broader context of art history and culture. This course is taught in English. The oral exam is conducted in French.

Latin V (Elective)

This course is the final one in the sequence of the Latin curriculum in the Secondary School and culminates in an oral exam of the French Baccalaureate. Students engage in oral and written activities based on themes such as philosophical thinking, scientific reasoning, political thought, and the reading of the program-mandated text (the text is changed every two years). Connections with other texts from the French and English curricula are made as often as possible. This course also includes notions of ancient Greek culture and language. The Latin section of the French Baccalaureate has a coefficient 3. This elective course is taught in French.

Music (Elective)

This course focuses on musical practices. Group listening is emphasized, which allows students to deepen their understanding of music through a study of space, time, color, and form. Students are exposed to a variety of musical works from different eras, genres, and styles. Classroom teaching is enriched by music practices (both vocal and instrumental). This course is taught in French.